The Educational Tourist Travel Guides for Kids – how they differ

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26 Responses

  1. I’m not a child, but I think I’d prefer to read the educational travel guides for kids instead of a traditional guidebook! How interesting to learn that the Swiss guards are actually the Pope’s bodyguards!

    • NatalieTanner says:

      Well, thank you! These travel guides are tried and true and kids love them. What they understand they enjoy! Stop the whining! 🙂

  2. Abigail says:

    Traveling with kids is definitely hard. You need to present the information to them in such a way that would awaken their curiosity!

  3. These guidebooks for kids sound very informative and fun. Love the idea of including activities like closing the Swiss guards uniforms. Kids who travel will get more our of the experience by being engaged. These books do that. Very nice.

  4. Maja says:

    I’m also not a child, but I find it very interesting! Traditional guidebooks say all those things we tend to forget easily, you tell it creative and innovative way. Can’t wait to have kids of my own to tell them stories like this.

  5. Creative guidebooks are my kind of thing, I’d probably be interested in this. Lol. And yes, I do agree with you about the writing thing. Even I need to write something to remember it and I don’t really need to see what I wrote, just the act of writing it down makes me remember it.

  6. I love the idea of getting kids more involved in planning their travels. A suitable guidebook is the first step. It seems like a great resource to give parents ideas of what to do in destinations that are not traditionally “child friendly.”

  7. FS says:

    I m an adult but I found it this quite interesting and useful.Traditional guidebooks say things more creatively. Thanks for sharing.

  8. Sounds like a great resource for the kids! I do think it’s so important that they learn some of the history/background behind the places they visit. too often you see kids herded from place to place without a full appreciation of what they’re seeing!

  9. Not a kid, but I definitely learned quite a bit here! So much interesting history to absorb. Good idea to know what you’re seeing so you can more truly appreciate it.

  10. I love the style how you write. Going to museums always was really boring for me when I was a kid and now I agree all the guides are written for history students haha

  11. When I was a kid, I was just excited to enter a museum and did not really bother to make research. I will try to this with my nephews so that they will have a more meaningful visit to a museum next time.

  12. Stacey says:

    These are awesome. I want to read them too! It’s a great way to keep kids interested and make it more memorable. Excellent

  13. Neha Verma says:

    Although not a kid, still I feel the same zombie thing if I enter a museum and have no idea what I am looking at or what is the significance attached with each of the things out there. So, this seems to be really awesome. I would like to try out myself

  14. Nadine Smith says:

    I think this is quite interesting, whether you’re a child or not. Guidebooks tend to be so uninspired and unoriginal sometimes, but with this, it’s easier to remember and it offers a fresh perspective. 🙂 So cool and totally interesting!

    • NatalieTanner says:

      I couldn’t agree more! Sometimes the information in guide books is so dry!! I think that is so sad because there is always something really cool and interesting to learn. How do they make it so dull!! LOL! Thanks for stopping by!

  15. Meg Cale says:

    Some of my most interesting childhood memories are the things we saw when we stopped on road trips. I remember visiting all kinds of national parks and museums. They’re not the most ideal places for small children, but I’m glad my parents took me.

    • NatalieTanner says:

      How wonderful to hear how much you enjoyed your family adventures. They make such lifelong memories! Thanks for sharing. That makes me smile.

  16. The Louvre is one of our favourite places. We’d love to read the guidebook for the Louvre. It must be full of fun facts and activities.

  17. What a great idea to write travel guides that speak to kids. Like you said, there’s a difference between having something written at a child’s reading level vs. having something written to speak to children at a level that interests and impact them. I don’t have many friends with kids but will definitely recommend it to the few I do have once their kids get a little older.

    • NatalieTanner says:

      Thanks, Diana. They make great ‘cliff notes’ for adults, too. I find that I learn so much when trying to get to the very essence of a topic for children. You really have to sift through so much information to get there. There is LOTS of information out there -especially on the internet, but getting to the heart of the matter is easier said than done! I appreciate you stopping by and recommending me to your friends.

  1. October 28, 2016

    […] forget the eBooks for the kids! Informative, educational, and FUN! Let me know if you don’t see your […]

  2. December 15, 2016

    […] Have you actually READ travel guides lately? It sure seems like the target audience for most is a retired history major. I say retired because who else has time to read 347 pages of the driest language on….. anything?   The history is complete, but it is too dry…and maybe too complete. The Educational Traveler wants to learn, but not literally EVERYTHING! Just the good stuff….just the interesting stuff…and that, ladies and gentlemen is just what is in my Travel Guides for kids – just the good stuff. Read more about how The Educational Tourist Travel Guides differ from the rest.  […]

  3. May 13, 2017

    […] My travel guides are different. I created them for my own kids when I couldn’t find anything on the market that was going to be interesting, hold their attention, and let us all learn something really cool on this once in a lifetime vacation! The kids are fascinated by art history – you just have to give them the right story…and in their language. My guides are written at an elementary school aged reading level so kids can read them all by themselves! They also serve as cliff notes for adults if your knowledge of history is a little rusty! […]

  4. October 19, 2017

    […] My travel guides are different. I created them for my own kids when I couldn’t find anything on the market that was going to be interesting, hold their attention, and let us all learn something really cool on this once in a lifetime vacation! The kids are fascinated by art history – you just have to give them the right story…and in their language. My guides are written at an elementary school aged reading level so kids can read them all by themselves! They also serve as cliff notes for adults if your knowledge of history is a little rusty! […]

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